From the Editors Desk

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January 2008

How to get the maximum out of this journal

After reading and understanding, ‘Suggested precautions’ (in Abstract and Advice), each doctor should try to correlate and apply these precautions in day-to-day practice. Shortcomings, if any, in personal practice, clinics, hospitals or staff must be addressed promptly and appropriately.

An illustration will make the point clear.
“Take separate and specific consent for surgery /procedure and for transfusion of blood, if anticipated” (Case of M. Chinnaiyan v/s Sri Gokulam Hospital & Anr - January 2008 issue, page a1)

The doctor must check whether his or her clinic and hospital follows this dictum of law. If not, the staff must be instructed immediately that in all cases of surgery two consent forms must be signed by the patient or his attendant - one form for surgery and another for transfusion of blood, if it is foreseen.

Proper protocols must be developed and religiously followed taking a cue from the ‘Suggested Precautions’. These precautions will not only indemnify the doctor and save him or her from medico-legal litigation but also help devise and perfect legally acceptable practice.

To get the best results out of this journal, the reader should cumulatively review ‘suggested precautions’ at least once every six months.

‘Suggested Precautions’ is the first of its kind and no law reporter in the world publishes anything similar.

We feel proud to state that ‘Suggested Precautions’ is the first of its kind and no law reporter in the world publishes anything similar.


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  • How to get the maximum out of this journal

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Key Features
  • Publishes ‘real time judgments’ on medical negligence from higher courts
  • Every judgment is further summarized in simple, non-legal language
  • Comprehensively guides a doctor on avoiding MedLegal issues
  • Suggests practically useful ‘Do’s & Don’ts’ in day-to-day practice
  • Cases selected / analyzed solely from a doctor’s viewpoint
  • Editorial team comprises of lawyers and doctors
  • Designed to pass relevant information quickly / effortlessly
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